And when government says it does care about you, it is demoralizing and belittling at best. Example: The majority opinion in West Coast Hotel v. Parrish in 1937.*

What can be closer to the public interest than the health of women and their protection from unscrupulous and overreaching employers? …The Legislature was entitled to adopt measures to reduce the evils of the “sweating system,” the exploiting of workers at wages so low as to be insufficient to meet the bare cost of living, thus making their very helplessness the occasion of a most injurious competition….

There is an additional and compelling consideration which recent economic experience has brought into a strong light. The exploitation of a class of workers who are in an unequal position with respect to bargaining power and are thus relatively defenseless against the denial of a living wage is not only detrimental to their health and well being, but casts a direct burden for their support upon the community.

First, it sounds like they really care about women: “What can be closer to the public interest than the health of women and their protection from unscrupulous and overreaching employers?”

Then, they show their true colors: “[Women] who are in an unequal position with respect to bargaining power and are thus relatively defenseless against the denial of a living wage is not only detrimental to their health and well being, but casts a direct burden for their support upon the community.”

In other words, women can’t take care of themselves, they are not equal and they will never be able to change that and therefore they must be a burden on all the men in the country.

Hot-damn! I’m so glad that the government can take care of a dame like me!

*Read Economic Liberty and the Constitution, a collection of essays by Jacob Hornberger, which is where I found this excerpt and learned about this particular Supreme Court case, among many others.